Tuesday, October 24, 2017 - 7:30pm

RENT1

This Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-winning masterpiece returns to the stage in a vibrant 20th anniversary touring production. A re-imagining of Puccini’s La Bohème, RENT follows an unforgettable year in the lives of seven artists struggling to follow their dreams without selling out. With its inspiring message of joy and hope in the face of fear, this timeless celebration of friendship and creativity reminds us to measure our lives with the only thing that truly matters – love.

On April 29, 1996, an original rock musical by al little-known composer opened on Broadway and forever changed the landscape of American theatre. Two decades later, Jonathan Larson’s Rent continues to speak loudly and defiantly to audiences across generations and all over the world.

In the original production actors were black, white and brown; the characters were straight, gay, bisexual and transgender. Although the show was famously inspired by Puccini’s opera, La Bohème, it was also a reflection of the life of its creator, Jonathan Larson, who wrote the book, music, and lyrics. His score brilliantly melded Broadway savvy with contemporary rock, and the show captured the zeitgeist of a particular place at a particular moment in time.

To celebrate the musical’s 20th anniversary, key members of the original creative team have reunited for a national tour of RENT, enabling a new generation to discover why the show is so special – and why it continues to have a profound effect on audiences.

For Kevin McCollum, one of the original producers of RENT, the show’s greatest legacy is its boundless humanity. “How do you measure a life?” he says, alluding to the lyrics of the show’s most famous song, “Seasons of Love.” “How do you measure a year? Attention must be paid to how you treat people and how you build family. Touch people, change people by loving each other against all odds. Live no day but today, and keep your artist’s heart. This is a musical about living with, not dying from disease, introduced at a time when people thought AIDS was a death sentence. And I think RENT helped take the patina off the idea that these people weren’t us. Straight, gay; sexuality was a character trait, but it wasn’t what the show was about. It’s about young people finding their voice against all odds. It’s a celebration of diversity, and how young people always change the world.”

This show features mature themes, language and situations.